“It looks like bones because the people are white lines!”

To finish up our exploration of the figure and figure representation, the Sunflower and Fern groups learned how to make styrofoam prints!  We began by passing around large sheets of styrofoam and tried to figure out what they were, what they could be used for, and what they felt like.

Nneka: Feels floppy and hard.

Trebor: Softly!

Zoe: Why is it so fragile?

Nayeli: I like how it feels.

Sarah: It feels like a plate.  It’s flat.

Mae: I really thought it was real paper, but it’s not.  It’s foam.  It’s squishy.

William: It feels like it could pop.

Next, I invited a friend to come to the stage and strike a pose.  With the back of a paintbrush, I modeled how to represent the pose onto styrofoam, just as friends have been doing for weeks with figure drawing on paper and on the Gelli plates.  Since the styrofoam was large, we were able to combine all poses from each art group into one image.

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Trebor: We’re going on the stage, oh yeah!

Zavier: I want to make one hundred million little people on here.

Adrian: Zoe did such a good job.  It looks just like me!

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Luke: I see movements on the styrofoam.

Iris: How do you draw in it? What do you use? Your nails?

Elijah: You know this is just how I stand so I could pose like this for an hour.

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Miguel: I see Briana has a little tiny button, even smaller than my button.

Destynee: I see it now!  The sun is on so I can see the people on the styrofoam.

Florentina: It feels really like a fabric sponge.  We capture the movement on it.

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This week, children created their edition of prints!  Friends picked a color of block print ink, rolled it out on plexiglass into a smooth layer, rolled it onto their styrofoam and printed it on large paper.  This is the first time we have ever done such large prints in the Studio, and they came out better than I even could have imagined!  Post Spring Break, this work will be on display in the PK hallway 🙂

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Andres: Why wont it go into the white part? Is it because we pushed down to draw?

Trebor: It’s on the paper.  Wow!

Nneka: Push down hard to get it on the paper.  I’m so strong.

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Maia: Sticky.  Ink is sticky.

Siena: I like how it sounds.

Rayyan: Rolling the ink sounds crunchy like a cookie or wood chips.

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Destynee: The ink doesn’t cover the hair.  Why?

Sophie: It looks like bones because the people are white lines.

Elijah: The blue ink looks like my toothpaste.

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Cameron: The paper is blue but the people are white.

Abigail: Don’t forget to roll on all the sides.

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Zavier: I made all the creative stuff because I’m a creative kid.

Mae: I was right! It printed on the paper!

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“Mine looks like a masterpiece. It looks like the Northern Lights!”

Over the past few weeks, friends in the Yellow art groups have been continuing to learn about and experiment with different printmaking processes.  Children spent two weeks working with Gelli plates, which are durable, gelatin printing plates that allow you to create monoprints over and over again.  This is the first year that I have working in the Studio with this material, but am so happy that I was able to take a class on it and introduce it to Pre-K friends!

How does the Gelli plate feel in your hands?

Sylvie: Soft like the ground floor.

Sophie: Like peanut butter and jelly.

Mackenzi: Ooey gooey.

Zoe: Whoa, it feels like jello!

Nneka: Squishy wishy.

Justin: Is it a jellyfish?

Abigail: Don’t squeeze the Gelli plate or it’ll break.

Next, friends began by putting a few small spots of paint on their Gelli plates and then rolled the paint over the plate with a brayer.

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The first week that we worked with Gelli plates, children used different types of stencils to make patterns and images to transfer to their paper.

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Next, children laid down a sheet of paper and applied pressure with their hands to transfer the paint.

Chrishelle: I remember… what you stamp will be on the paper.

Ryler: You can never make the same thing again.

Sasha: It’s so pretty it’ll make my dad cry!

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While friends were learning about this process, Ms.Lewton, the Head of the Art Department, stopped by and children had the opportunity to teach her how to use the Gelli plate.

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The following week, friends used finger stamps to create marks and images on their Gelli plate.

Miles: The finger stamps are boinging on the Gelli plate.

Reese: I like how squishy the Gelli plate is.  The paper gets stuck to it because it’s sticky.

Zoe: Mine looks like a masterpiece.  It looks like the Northern Lights!

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This week, children signed their finished prints for their portfolios!

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What! Stamping with Legos?

This week, Tuesday art groups continued to learn about printmaking by creating Lego prints! Friends explored shape, line and pattern while stamping with these materials and enthusiasm continued to build around the process. For the next month, children that come to the Studio on Tuesday’s will continue to work with a variety of printmaking processes!

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Sophie: They make the same shapes!  Small and big rectangles.  It makes it look cool!

Mouhammadou: You can use little Legos to make little buildings.

Ryler: I made vegetable prints at home with my friend!  She thought it was so funny!

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Miles: You can use all three sides and they all look different.  They make different shapes.  I wonder how you can make clouds?

Chrishelle: What!  Stamping with Legos?

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“Celery looks like a beautiful paintbrush!”

Between selecting work for portfolios, and ice skating adventures, it feels like forever since we’ve been able to get messy in the Studio!  The week following winter break, children selected their favorite piece of art from the first half of the year for their portfolio.  At the end of the year, they will share their work with their families!

Today we kicked off a long-term printmaking study with the Yellow groups!  Printmaking is one of my favorite processes to teach, and I’m excited to try out some new techniques that I learned during my intensive study this summer in Greece!  We began by brainstorming what children thought printmaking was…

Abdoulaye: It’s like making footprints with something.

Florentina: A print is a stamp from a stamper.

Mackenzi: Is it like a printer?

Zoe: I think it means you print out pictures you already made.

Logan: You can print things that you love!

Friends had many great guesses and were excited to use different types of stamps to explore printmaking.  Children were curious about the process, especially when I brought over a tray of fruits and vegetables and explained that these would be the materials we would print with today!

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Ryler: It smells like celery in here!  Are we going to have a taste test?  Is that why we need smocks?

Bennett: Can you print an apple?

Friends got right to work on their fruit and vegetable prints.  Children explored shape through the organic patterns in the fruit, as well as color mixing.

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Chrishelle: You can stamp to make a picture of a snowman.

Sasha: You have to get the food dirty.  Real food!

Mouhammadou: I’m making a caterpillar out of celery.  Celery looks like a beautiful paintbrush.  It makes a different kind of painting.

Miles: I’ve painted before, but never with a juicy orange!

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“Ah! A giant sage leaf!”

As we prepare for the Market at our Showcase (May 7 from 11:30-1:30), the Studio has been busy making products with herbs.  The Thursday and Friday art groups have just finished their herb stamps that we will begin printing for greeting cards next week!  We began by talking about different herbs and studying them with magnifying glasses.  Friends loved sharing what they knew about herbs, as they have been studying herbs in expert groups in their classrooms for the past few weeks!

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Matteo: Basil is sweet like candy!

Ezekiel: I love you, basil.

Ebbisa: Did you give these herbs some sunshine?  Herbs love sunshine.

Gabriela: It’s lavender with the flower.

AJ: Sage is a nice plant and it saved me for real.  I ate a little piece and it made me feel better after I ate a licorice plant.

Kofi: I see a bug in the basil because it’s his home.

After we used our senses, and small magnifying glasses to observe the herbs, I introduced friends to a magnifying screen!  Children loved making faces behind the screen and were able to get a closer look at the herbs on the table.

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Paris: It makes your face look gigantic!

Minna: It looks like Samantha is in the movie behind the magnifying scream.  I mean screen.

Next, friends sketched the herbs on sheets of styrofoam in preparation to stamp on cards next week!

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Jude: It’s kind of easy to push into the styrofoam… it feels good and looks cool when you make the little dots.  It’s like little bumps.

Jasper: I need the magnifying screen to see the herbs really well.

Haley: I’m putting dots on mine.  I see the dots in the magnifying glass.

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Minna: It looks bumps so it’s sage.  It’s sage!

Samantha: Ah!  A giant sage leaf!

Betsabe: Mine is cute.  Them cute.  I’m making little flowers.

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“The sun has to work hard to do them!”

Today in the Studio, art groups experimented with sun prints as a photographic process.  We began by observing a sun print and taking guesses about how it was made and what types of objects were used.

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Looks like:

Jude: My moms belly.

Alexia: A jellyfish and a bear.

Michael: Did I see an eyeball?

Gabby: Let me look closely… a stone, a car and a game.

Darian: Is it a shark?

Next, friends shared materials that they brought from home.  Children enjoyed sharing where their materials came from, as well as sharing them with their friends.

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Wallace: My mom cut out some of her clothes.  And ribbon and some cardboard with stuff on it.

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AJ: Lots of leaves that are dry, some snowflakes that stick, paper with holes and a tree.

After friends selected the materials they wanted to use for their sun prints, they assembled them on light sensitive paper.  Some groups worked on this outside, while others lucked out because there was a lot of sun flooding into the Studio.  As friends waited for the sun to do it’s job, children worked in the sketchbooks.

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Sarah: The sun has to work hard to do them.

Quentin: Look, the paper’s turning colors!

Alexia: Sun prints are mysterious.

Owen: When you pick the objects up, the shapes on the paper.

Darian: Sun… please shine down on me!

Maceo: Mine looks like a snowman.

Once the paper turned from dark to light blue, friends rinsed the paper in bins filled with water.  Children were ecstatic when they took their sun prints out of the water and loved sharing prints with their friends!

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Chris: The water makes it bright.

Jasper: You put stuff on paper and you put it in the sun and the objects dry into the paper.

Elias: They match what’s on the sun print!