“I got a teeny tiny brush to use for my teeny tiny ears!”

Last week, we continued to read The Skin You Live In by Michael Tyler and began discussing different colors that we noticed on our face and body.  Friends used liquid watercolors to mix their skin colors and added them to the self portraits that they began the previous week.  Children selected from a variety of paint brushes, based on the amount of detail they wanted to add, versus filling in large areas of their face with paint.

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Theo: Sometimes my hair is a little bit this color.  I need a lot of different colors for my face.

Frances: What does “layering” mean?  Is adding water layering?  I’ll try just adding a little water.  I made my skin lighter!

Hope: My hair is darker than my face.

Mina: Water makes the colors lighter.

Asa: I need mostly water and a little bit of paint.  The paint is foggy.  It makes it so I can’t see my nose.

Noah: Big brush for the head, little brush for my eyes.  And my hair.

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Jayden: It’s me!  It looks like my skin.

Amie: Rinse, rinse, rinse again to make it lighter.

Lenin: This color like coffee.

Lorenzo: This is a fire brown!  It has red in it.

Leba: I’m using the darkest dark for my hair.

Isaiah: I’m using a little bit of water.  It got light brown.

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Aria: I got a teeny tiny brush to use for my teeny tiny ears.

Farah: My hair is kind of blond.  One of my ears looks stuck in my hair.  And my lips are kind of red.

Maya: This brush is not tiny, it’s medium.  I’m using a skinny brush for my mouth.

Uhura: My skin is honey skin.  And my tongue is pink.

Kyrie: I see my hair is dark black.  My teeth are white.  I know I have blood in my eye.  I could add that.

Jax: We have different skin.  I’m light brown but I’m darker brown than Africa Grace.

Africa Grace: Yeah, mine is lighter.  My mom has light skin, too.  I’ve seen wood that’s the color of my skin.  I don’t see my skin color but maybe I can mix it.  I’m gonna add red because I see red on my arms and I need dark for my hair.

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Below are some scanned images of self portraits in process!

 

“I love how it feels in my hands!”

Happy Monday from the Pre-K Art Studio!  Today, Monday groups learned how to make their own paper!  Friends enjoyed the hands-on process and are looking forward to seeing how their paper will look when it’s dry.

We began by looking at some handmade paper, and children discussed what they thought the material was.

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Matteo: It looks like a painted rock.

Jaslene: It think it’s some kind of paper.

Logan: Did it come from the moon?

Ebbisa: Is it cardboard?  It’s like were recycling.

Miles H.: Feels like a blue snowflake that can bend and break a little bit.  I can use it as a fan.

Jasmine: Looks like seaweed and feels soft.

Next, friends ripped up all different types of paper into small pieces.  We used different colors of tissue paper, paper towels and pages from magazines.

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Once all the paper was ripped small enough, we put it all in the blender.  Next we covered the paper with water.  Friends likes using squirt bottles to soak all of the paper!Image

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And then… we blended it!

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We brought the blender back over to the big table and observed what types of changes had happened to the paper when it was blended with water.  Friends learned that this was called paper pulp and couldn’t wait to begin working with the material.

Kofi: It looks like spinach now… yuck!

Paris: I think when we turned on the blender it turned the paper to paint.

Daniel T.: The making machine made it look like juice.

Next, friends put screens on top of small bowls and scooped out a handful of paper pulp.  They spread the pulp on the screen and pushed as much of the water out as they could!  It was surprising to see that the water in the bowl was no longer clear, but dyed the color of tissue paper they used!

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Jaslene: It turned into watercolors… let’s paint with it!

Roman: I love how it feels in my hands.

Miles F.: I did it!  The water’s in the bowl now, not in the paper.  It has to dry to be paper.

Ebbisa: All the juice is coming out.

Finally, friends pressed the paper between sheets of felt to get rid of as much water as they could.  Some children chose to paint with the colored water after they finished, which they compared to watercolors!

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We can’t wait to see how our paper looks when we dry!