“It smells like an ice cream sandwich in there!”

On Tuesday and Thursday of this week, Pre-K friends visited Revolution Foods for a fieldwork experience.  It was great to see where our school lunches were made and to meet some of the chefs that prep for our school.  Children that are in the Thursday art groups were the photographers on the trip and put their new skills to the test!  Friends enjoyed asking chefs and drivers if they wanted their photograph taken, as well as photographing machinery, food production and herbs.  It was hard to select photos from the 400 (wow!) that were taken, so here is a taste of our days at Revolution Foods.

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Alexia: I smell lunch.

Michael: Wow… I took a picture of the herbs!

Jasper: This food doesn’t just go to Cap City… my dad said it also goes to E.L.Haynes.

Jude: There’s so many machines.  I mean pipes.

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Ezekiel: It’s cutting all the plastic.  It makes them smaller.

Wallace: I see pineapple.  I’ve had it before.

Jasmine: I’ve had those before… they are President cookies.

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Ty: I’m freezing.  That freezer is freezing.

Amaya: Excuse me… gentleman… what is that?  An oven?

Owen: That oven’s blowing hot air.

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Jasmine: I counted 19 ovens.

Phoenix: Smells like an ice cream sandwich in there.

Jasper: The kitchen was my favorite.  It had lots of cool machines!

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Jasmine: I asked why they put stickers on the food.  The chef said because then you know what your food is.

Ty:  Herbs have special taste powers.

Vandell: Can you open the door again?  I want to take a picture in the oven.  I wont get close.

Now… no photography experience would be complete with out some selfies!  Here are some great ones from our fieldwork.

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“May I please take a picture of you… please?”

In preparation for our field work at Revolution Foods next week, friends in the Thursday art groups continued to photograph with digital cameras.  We began the day by discussing what we might see at Revolution Foods…

Georgi: Machines and people.

Wallace: People that bring our food.

Michael: Chefs that have to cook for the judges.

Chris: Food and mint and salad.  Maybe a giant robot making food.

Owen: Ovens… fish… I don’t like the fish from there, though.

Darian: Maybe… yes… people!

Next, I shared with friends that they had a big job to do next week because I need their help as document photographers on the trip!  All groups thought that they would see people at Revolution Foods and we began discussing how to ask peers if they were okay with having their picture taken.

Wallace: Excuse me, can I take your picture?  They may say yes or no or maybe.

Michael: May I please take a picture of you… please?

Jasper: If they say no, don’t take it.

Michael: And if you do, you might get a ticket from the police.

Sarah: You can tell them that they look gorgeous.

Gabby: You can say thank you!

A big job like this comes with big responsibilities!  Friends decided that they must always walk while holding cameras and that they should wear the strap to the camera around their wrist. We decided that when I say “wrist check,” friends would hold up their cameras and we make sure they are all safe and secure.

Jasper: Keep it on your wrist so it’s safe and doesn’t fall.

Michael: They are really expensive… like infinity dollars.

Next, children asked their friends in the Studio if they could take their photograph.

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Once we practiced in the Studio, we decided to take a walk around the school to see if there was anyone that we could ask to photograph.  Children became incredibly excited whenever they saw a teacher or another student in the hallway.  Here are some of their photographs from our adventure!

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Many thanks to everyone for being so open to us photographing them today!  Friends really loved it and it was great practice for our fieldwork next week.  Here are some of my photos from my perspective today…

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“I love how it feels in my hands!”

Happy Monday from the Pre-K Art Studio!  Today, Monday groups learned how to make their own paper!  Friends enjoyed the hands-on process and are looking forward to seeing how their paper will look when it’s dry.

We began by looking at some handmade paper, and children discussed what they thought the material was.

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Matteo: It looks like a painted rock.

Jaslene: It think it’s some kind of paper.

Logan: Did it come from the moon?

Ebbisa: Is it cardboard?  It’s like were recycling.

Miles H.: Feels like a blue snowflake that can bend and break a little bit.  I can use it as a fan.

Jasmine: Looks like seaweed and feels soft.

Next, friends ripped up all different types of paper into small pieces.  We used different colors of tissue paper, paper towels and pages from magazines.

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Once all the paper was ripped small enough, we put it all in the blender.  Next we covered the paper with water.  Friends likes using squirt bottles to soak all of the paper!Image

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And then… we blended it!

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We brought the blender back over to the big table and observed what types of changes had happened to the paper when it was blended with water.  Friends learned that this was called paper pulp and couldn’t wait to begin working with the material.

Kofi: It looks like spinach now… yuck!

Paris: I think when we turned on the blender it turned the paper to paint.

Daniel T.: The making machine made it look like juice.

Next, friends put screens on top of small bowls and scooped out a handful of paper pulp.  They spread the pulp on the screen and pushed as much of the water out as they could!  It was surprising to see that the water in the bowl was no longer clear, but dyed the color of tissue paper they used!

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Jaslene: It turned into watercolors… let’s paint with it!

Roman: I love how it feels in my hands.

Miles F.: I did it!  The water’s in the bowl now, not in the paper.  It has to dry to be paper.

Ebbisa: All the juice is coming out.

Finally, friends pressed the paper between sheets of felt to get rid of as much water as they could.  Some children chose to paint with the colored water after they finished, which they compared to watercolors!

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We can’t wait to see how our paper looks when we dry!

“The sun has to work hard to do them!”

Today in the Studio, art groups experimented with sun prints as a photographic process.  We began by observing a sun print and taking guesses about how it was made and what types of objects were used.

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Looks like:

Jude: My moms belly.

Alexia: A jellyfish and a bear.

Michael: Did I see an eyeball?

Gabby: Let me look closely… a stone, a car and a game.

Darian: Is it a shark?

Next, friends shared materials that they brought from home.  Children enjoyed sharing where their materials came from, as well as sharing them with their friends.

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Wallace: My mom cut out some of her clothes.  And ribbon and some cardboard with stuff on it.

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AJ: Lots of leaves that are dry, some snowflakes that stick, paper with holes and a tree.

After friends selected the materials they wanted to use for their sun prints, they assembled them on light sensitive paper.  Some groups worked on this outside, while others lucked out because there was a lot of sun flooding into the Studio.  As friends waited for the sun to do it’s job, children worked in the sketchbooks.

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Sarah: The sun has to work hard to do them.

Quentin: Look, the paper’s turning colors!

Alexia: Sun prints are mysterious.

Owen: When you pick the objects up, the shapes on the paper.

Darian: Sun… please shine down on me!

Maceo: Mine looks like a snowman.

Once the paper turned from dark to light blue, friends rinsed the paper in bins filled with water.  Children were ecstatic when they took their sun prints out of the water and loved sharing prints with their friends!

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Chris: The water makes it bright.

Jasper: You put stuff on paper and you put it in the sun and the objects dry into the paper.

Elias: They match what’s on the sun print!

Kicking off our herb case study with… a tea party!

Today was a very exciting day in Pre-K as we kicked off our case study of herbs with… a tea party!  Families donated decaffeinated peppermint tea and let us borrow an assortment of tea pots for the special event.  Friends were served tea by the fairies (staff and parents) that were wearing wings, and enjoyed a special snack of fancy tea cookies and berries.

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Neche: Are those the tea cups we made with you?

Leah: It tastes like mint and fairies.

Jose: I no like.

Mouhammadou: My mommy and daddy have tea.  I love this tea party… the tea and the snacks.

There was a lot of excitement after the tea party, which was perfect because two of today’s art groups was working on creating items for their own tea party!  Last week, children made tea cups and tea snacks out of Model Magic.  This week, friends were excited to discover that the Model Magic dried and that they could now paint their tea cups.

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Alberto: It’s sparkly inside, like magic.  I’m doing a really good job… we all are!

Samantha: It’s hard… last week it wasn’t hard.