“You can bend wire so it looks like a house!”

Monday art groups are continuing their sculpture work and worked with a new material today… wire!  Children have had experiences with pipe cleaners and have enjoyed bending and twisting them to make different lines and shapes.  We compared wire with pipe cleaners today and incorporated both into our three-dimensional sculpture work this morning.

Claire: You could make letters or bend it like an octagon!

Adrian: You could bend wire so it looks like a house.

Phoenix: If you bend wire it makes the buttons not be able to move.  They get trapped.

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Jose: Pipe cleaners twist like wire but they are hairy.

Mae: I made a slide for my bear.  It’s a school for bears and it has a playground!

“The pipe cleaner looks like a person wrapped up in a towel at the pool!”

Over the past few weeks, Thursday art groups have been using a variety of materials to create sculptures!  Friends will continue to create three-dimensional sculptures in the Studio throughout February.

We began by creating “Crazy Line Sculptures” with Model Magic, pipe cleaners and beads.  Friends explored line, shape, balance and rhythm through manipulation of Model Magic, as well as by cutting, bending and twisting pipe cleaners to create different types of “crazy lines!”

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Alberto: Careful, pipe cleaners are sharp!

Amaya: It looks like a roller coaster.  It has hills that go up and go down.

Kofi: The pipe cleaner looks like a person wrapped up in a towel at the pool.

Elmys: It say “boing boing!”

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Maceo: Lines can be crazy.  They can be straight or twisty like a twizzler.

Andres: It look like a spring and sound like a slide.

Emely: It’s like a wiggle worm!

Ezekiel: Model Magic feels like marshmallows.  It looks like marshmallows, too.

The following week, friends were so excited that their sculptures were dry and that they could take them home!  However, before the sculptures were ready to leave the Studio, children worked on an observational drawing.  This process helped friends reflect on the color, line and shape that they observed in their artwork.

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Luke: I see loop de loops.

Maia: It’s a great idea to draw and paint your sculpture.  Then we can look at it again!

Ronan: So many crazy lines.  They go up, and to the side and loops.  Drawing what you made means you have to look at it closely.

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What! Stamping with Legos?

This week, Tuesday art groups continued to learn about printmaking by creating Lego prints! Friends explored shape, line and pattern while stamping with these materials and enthusiasm continued to build around the process. For the next month, children that come to the Studio on Tuesday’s will continue to work with a variety of printmaking processes!

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Sophie: They make the same shapes!  Small and big rectangles.  It makes it look cool!

Mouhammadou: You can use little Legos to make little buildings.

Ryler: I made vegetable prints at home with my friend!  She thought it was so funny!

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Miles: You can use all three sides and they all look different.  They make different shapes.  I wonder how you can make clouds?

Chrishelle: What!  Stamping with Legos?

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“Celery looks like a beautiful paintbrush!”

Between selecting work for portfolios, and ice skating adventures, it feels like forever since we’ve been able to get messy in the Studio!  The week following winter break, children selected their favorite piece of art from the first half of the year for their portfolio.  At the end of the year, they will share their work with their families!

Today we kicked off a long-term printmaking study with the Yellow groups!  Printmaking is one of my favorite processes to teach, and I’m excited to try out some new techniques that I learned during my intensive study this summer in Greece!  We began by brainstorming what children thought printmaking was…

Abdoulaye: It’s like making footprints with something.

Florentina: A print is a stamp from a stamper.

Mackenzi: Is it like a printer?

Zoe: I think it means you print out pictures you already made.

Logan: You can print things that you love!

Friends had many great guesses and were excited to use different types of stamps to explore printmaking.  Children were curious about the process, especially when I brought over a tray of fruits and vegetables and explained that these would be the materials we would print with today!

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Ryler: It smells like celery in here!  Are we going to have a taste test?  Is that why we need smocks?

Bennett: Can you print an apple?

Friends got right to work on their fruit and vegetable prints.  Children explored shape through the organic patterns in the fruit, as well as color mixing.

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Chrishelle: You can stamp to make a picture of a snowman.

Sasha: You have to get the food dirty.  Real food!

Mouhammadou: I’m making a caterpillar out of celery.  Celery looks like a beautiful paintbrush.  It makes a different kind of painting.

Miles: I’ve painted before, but never with a juicy orange!

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“Is it a bag of cheese? It looks like a bag of cheese!”

Over the past couple of weeks, friends have been working with clay in the Studio!  Clay is one of my favorite mediums to introduce in the Studio because it’s open-ended and allows for rich conversation and imaginative play.

What do you think this material is?

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Kofi: It looks like paper mache.  It’s heavier though.

Maia: Soft and mushy.  Is it frozen?

Abigail: It’s cookie dough because it’s white and it’s cold.

Ronan: I think it’s clay.  Hey, I didn’t know it would be wet.

Selwyn: It’s a potato because it makes the table dirty and it’s the color of a potato.  It’s heavy to me but I’m strong, I’m so strong.  I can pick up the potato.

William: Is that slime?

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Adrian: I thought clay was brown.

Andres: Is it marshmallows?

Marley: Is it a bag of cheese?  It looks like a bag of cheese.

Alberto: If it’s clay then bricks are made from it.

Christian: It’s like a stone block.

Luke: When it dries, it’ll be hard like my skull.

Mae: Is it claydough?  Clay… like ballet.

Florentina: Hey, that feels interesting.  Is it wet paper that you put in a bag?

Once we discovered that the mystery material was clay, I introduced some different types of tools that would be available to use with the clay.

Daniel: It looks like what you use to flip a pancake.  And this one is a bammer… it bams spiders.

Ryler: That looks like a little fork.  It makes lines like a fork.

Abdoulaye: Cookers use that to make dough flat.

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Alberto: Tools can do much more things then hands.

Kofi: That tool looks like a duck beak.  The wire tool makes it flat like a pizza dough.  Or a pillow.  It’s perfect.

Yonathan: That tool scratches like a tiger.

Bennett: I’m using the hammer like my daddy.

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Mackenzi: The wire looks like nunchucks.

Mouhammadou: When you cut it with scissors, flatten it up with the hammer to make it feel better.

… and here are some finished sculptures!

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Kofi: That’s the thing about art… you have to get messy.  That’s the point.

“Is it a web? It looks like your fingers are swinging through a vine!”

Over the last couple weeks, friends have been learning how to weave in the Studio!  Children began by practicing on paper looms before putting their new skills to the test on the big classroom loom.

What is a loom?

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Daniel: It looks like a guitar.  Or a spider web.

Amaya: Is it a hula skirt?

Sylvie: It’s a stringy thing.  It goes over, under, over, under.

Justin: Is it a web?  It looks like your fingers are swinging through a vine!

Florentina: Is it a door?

Zuri: It’s a loom, I remember it from last year.

Ryler: It looks like part of an octopus.

Chrishelle: It looks like a belt.

Abdoulaye: It’s a guitar, or a cello.

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Kofi: I know how it works.  There are cuts in the paper and the paper zig zags through it.  It looks like a chess board.

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Children that had experience with the loom last year really stepped up as leaders and helped teach their new friends how to weave!

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Phoenix: I remember this… it goes over, under, over, under, through.

Asiah: It’s soft and the yarn makes a pattern.

Logan: It goes “schwoop schwoop” through the yarn.

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